Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 11, 2014

Witness a city in transformation, glimpse exotic animals, explore the past and enjoy that beach before the crowds. Somewhere within this list, we are SURE you can find somewhere to visit before the end of the year is upon us! Take a look below….

capetown-15641. Cape Town, South Africa

A place to meditate on freedom,
and the creative life that followed.

When Nelson Mandela was incarcerated at Robben Island prison, he found inspiration in Cape Town. “We often looked across Table Bay at the magnificent silhouette of Table Mountain,” he said in a speech. “To us on Robben Island, Table Mountain was a beacon of hope. It represented the mainland to which we knew we would one day return.”

Cape Town’s importance to Mandela, who made his first address there as a free man, will doubtless draw many visitors in the wake of his death. The country has transformed itself since Mandela’s imprisonment, but there’s still much to be done. Many in Cape Town have been grappling with that challenge, including its creative class, which has been examining whether inspired design can solve some of the issues stemming from years of inequality.

The city formally takes up that issue this year during its turn as World Design Capital. Cape Town is celebrating design in all its forms, putting on fashion shows by students and established designers alike, hosting architecture open houses, welcoming the public into artists’ studios and folding the annual visual arts spectacular Design Indaba conference, which took place in February, into the design capital program. Also part of the lineup are locals seeking to rejuvenate impoverished black-majority townships: The Maboneng Lalela Project turns township homes into galleries and performance spaces; Foodpods constructs sustainable farms, giving residents access to healthy produce; and the Langa Quarter project seeks to make the precinct a cultural tourism destination.

Cape Town is again reinventing itself, and the world is invited to its renaissance. — SARAH KHAN

christchurch-15642. Christchurch, New Zealand

The rebirth of a quake-ravaged city.

Three years after two large earthquakes devastated central Christchurch, the city is experiencing a rebirth with creativity and wit — thanks to the ingenuity of its hardy residents — and is welcoming tourists back again. Though much of the central city has yet to be rebuilt, entrepreneurs and volunteers are finding surprising ways to make temporary use of empty lots and bring life back to the downtown. The Gap Filler program, begun a couple of months after the first quake in September 2010 and expanded after a more destructive second quake in February 2011, has created a dance floor with coin-operated music and lights and even a nine-hole mini-golf course in vacant lots across the city. The Greening the Rubble campaign has since the 2010 quake been planting temporary gardens on the sites of demolished buildings. To replace the badly damaged 19th-century ChristChurch Cathedral, a magnificent transitional church by the Japanese architect Shigeru Ban opened in 2013 with sturdy cardboard tubes for the roof. Businesses are also trickling back downtown. One bar, built inside shipping containers, has a name that encapsulates the spirit of the entire city: Revival. —JUSTIN BERGMAN

3. North Coast, California

A glorious new preserve for the public.ncalifornia-900

One hundred and thirty miles north of San Francisco, the moody bluffs of the Mendocino Coast have long been a spectacular place from which to observe marine life: passing humpback whales, sun-happy sea lions, foamy waves strewn with kelp. The incorporation of the Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands — nearly 1,300 acres — gives hikers new access to a contiguous 12-mile stretch of coastline and fields of wildflowers, cypress forests and cliff areas (some overlooking dramatic blowholes, pinnacles and sea caves), much of it previously off-limits to the public. And Congressional proposals to include the north coast lands as part of the California Coastal National Monument have passed, which means better protection and more funds for maintenance; plans also exist to extend the California Coastal Trail through the new preserve. — BONNIE TSUI

 4. Albanian Coastalbania-1564

On a rugged shore, Europe at its best.

What if you could combine the rugged beauty you’d find on Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast with the ruins of an undiscovered Turkey or Greece, all wrapped in the easygoing nature characteristic of rural Italy — at a fraction of the cost? Turns out you can, on the coast of Albania. The roughly Maryland-size country, between Greece and Montenegro, sits about 45 miles east of Italy on the eastern shores of the Adriatic and has limestone-ringed beaches, ancient ruins like Butrint and waterfront inns where you can stay for less than $50 a night. Rampant development threatened to turn it all to concrete in the years after Communism, but a new government took office in 2013 on promises of keeping the coast authentic. Head to villages like Qeparo, within sight of Corfu, where you can kayak past Cold War submarine tunnels, swim by abandoned forts and watch the tide rise during a dinner of fresh fish at an inn called the Riviera. This is Europe when it was fresh and cheap. — TIM NEVILLE

5. Downtown Los Angeles

Downtown? Really? Yes, thanks to a thriving food scene.

Gone is the musty, lifeless, only-open-for-Kings-hockey-games reputation of losangeles-900downtown Los Angeles. While the museums in this corner of the city are thriving (the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art is nearby), the growing dynamism of downtown is the food scene. Most notable is the Grand Central Market, an arcade of over 30 of the best food vendors in the city. Originally built in 1917, the market has been redone in the past year, attracting popular purveyors like G&B Coffee and, soon, Belcampo Meat Co. Just down the street is Alma, which was named the best new restaurant in the country by Bon Appétit magazine. And where there is good food there is good shopping. Stores have added cachet to the neighborhood; an outlet of the fashion label Acne Studios opened in December, and Aesop, a skin-care specialist, in May. Diners and shoppers alike also have a hip place to stay: An Ace Hotel opened early this year. — DANIELLE PERGAMENT

namibia-15646. Namibia

Africa’s latest conservation success story is a boon for travelers.

Namibia’s communal conservancy movement, which pairs sustainable tourism with rural community outreach, has been a much-heralded success: In 2013, the country’s 79 conservancies received the prestigious Gift to the Earth Award from the World Wildlife Fund, and the stunning Namib Sand Sea Desert joined Unesco’s World Heritage list. Options abound for travelers who want to help the effort, including the Desert Rhino Camp, which Wilderness Safaris runs in partnership with the Save the Rhino Trust; the camp directly supports the conservancy, which has reversed dwindling rhino populations. Wilderness Safaris also plans to open the Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp, on the Hoanib River in the north. And Namibia’s Tourism Board introduced three self-drive routes this year to point visitors toward less-visited parts of the country. — ADAM H. GRAHAM

See the rest of this awesome list here.

Have you been somewhere that you feel should have made the list of places to go in 2014? By all means, share them in the comment section below. We are always looking for new adventure locations!

Let’s continue to shine, Everyone!

~DHSI

If you would like to unearth more secrets that you need to know about your career or your next interview, http://www.diamondhospitalityblog.com is THE place to be. We also share hospitality & travel information, as well as uplifting & inspiring posts/stories. Subscribe to our blog and share it with your network. Visit http://www.diamondhospitalityservices.com to see what we are about. We are here to help and inspire!

About the Authors

Produced by Alicia DeSantis, Jessie DeWitt, Lexi Mainland, Sona Patel, Josh Robinson, Dan Saltzstein, James Thomas, Josh Williams, Nancy Donaldson and Margaret Cheatham William.

Advertisements